How Many Books Are In The Catholic Old Testament?

In this post, we’ll take a look at how many books are in the Catholic Old Testament. We’ll also look at how this number compares to other versions of the Bible.

Checkout this video:

How Many Books Are In The Catholic Old Testament?

The Catholic Old Testament consists of 46 books, including the 39 books that are found in the Protestant Old Testament, as well as seven additional books. These seven books are known as the deuterocanonical books, which are considered canonical by the Catholic Church but are non-canonical by Protestants. The deuterocanonical books include Tobit, Judith, 1 and 2 Maccabees, Sirach (also known as Ecclesiasticus), Baruch, and parts of Esther and Daniel.

The Books of the Old Testament

The Catholic Bible consists of the Old Testament and the New Testament, with the Old Testament containing 46 books and the New Testament 27. The Old Testament books are further divided into four categories: the Pentateuch, Historical Books, Poetical Books, and the Prophets.

The Canon of the Old Testament

The Canon of the Old Testament is the collection of books that belong in the Hebrew Bible. The term “canon” comes from the Greek word κανών, meaning “measuring stick.” The Canon of the Old Testament was formalized at the Council of Jamnia in AD 100.

The Catholic Church recognizes 46 books as belonging to the Old Testament: 39 books are shared with Protestants, while 7 others are unique to Catholic and Orthodox Bibles. These 7 extra books are referred to as the deuterocanonical books.

The Deuterocanonical Books

There are 46 books in the Catholic Old Testament. This includes the 39 books that are in the Protestant Old Testament, as well as the 7 Deuterocanonical books. These 7 extra books are: Tobit, Judith, 1 and 2 Maccabees, Wisdom, Sirach (Ecclesiasticus), and Baruch.

The Septuagint

The Bible used by Catholics includes the same books as the protestant Bible, plus seven additional books in what is called the Old Testament. The Catholic Bible includes a total of 46 books in the Old Testament, while the protestant Bible only has 39.

The additional books are referred to as the deuterocanonical books, and they are: Tobit, Judith, Wisdom of Solomon, Sirach (also called Ecclesiasticus), Baruch, 1 Maccabees, and 2 Maccabees. These books were written in Greek and are included in a version of the Old Testament known as the Septuagint.

The Septuagint is a Greek translation of the Hebrew Scriptures that was used by Greek-speaking Jews in ancient times. It includes all of the 39 books of the protestant Old Testament, plus the seven deuterocanonical books.

The Vulgate

The Vulgate is the official Latin Bible of the Catholic Church. It is an extensive revision of the earlier Latin Bible, the Vetus Latina. The Vulgate’s Old Testament consists of 46 books: 39 books from the Hebrew Scriptures (or protocanon) plus 7 deuterocanonical books (or apocrypha).

The Council of Trent

The Council of Trent was a 16th century Ecumenical Council of the Catholic Church. One of its key decisions was to affirm the canon of the Old Testament as consisting of 46 books.

The Books of the New Testament

The New Testament is a collection of 27 books, all of which were written by early Christians. These books were written in order to provide guidance and instruction to new Christians, and to record the teachings of Jesus Christ. The New Testament contains four Gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John), which tell the story of Christ’s life and teachings, as well as the Acts of the Apostles, which records the early history of the Christian church. Additionally, there are 21 letters written by various authors (Paul’s Letters, General Letters, and John’s Letters), which provide guidance on how to live a Christian life. Finally, there is the Book of Revelation, which offers a glimpse into the future.

The Canon of the New Testament

The New Testament canon did not come together all at once. It is generally believed that the first list of New Testament books was drawn up by Irenaeus, bishop of Lyons, in the late 2nd century. This is probably the first instance in which all 27 books were brought together and formally accepted as Scripture. However, it was not until the 4th century that the New Testament canon began to take shape in its present form.

The Development of the New Testament Canon

Christianity began as a Jewish sect in the 1st century AD, and the early followers of Jesus preserved their scriptures in Hebrew. But as Christianity began to spread to Gentiles (non-Jews), it became clear that a translation into Greek would be necessary so that these new converts would be able to understand the Bible. This Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible is called the Septuagint (often abbreviated “LXX”).

The Septuagint was used by Greek-speaking Jews as well as Gentile Christians, and it quickly became the de facto standard Bible among Christians in the late first and early second centuries. However, there were some differences between the Hebrew and Greek versions of certain books, particularly in Esther and Daniel. In addition, there were other works (such as 1 and 2 Clement, the Didache, and the Epistle of Barnabas) that were widely circulated among Christians but were not included in either version of the Bible.

So what’s in the Catholic Old Testament? The short answer is that it includes all 46 books of the Hebrew Bible, plus 7 additional books that are only found in Greek versions of the Bible (these are often referred to as “the deuterocanonical books”). In total, then, there are 53 books in the Catholic Old Testament.

Scroll to Top